The Creation in Christ

All things were made by him, and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men.
— John 1:3-4

It seems to me that any lover of the gospel can hardly have failed to feel dissatisfaction with the close of the third verse of John 1: “All things were made by him, and without him was not anything made that was made.” That it is no worse than redundant can be no satisfaction to the man who would find perfection, if he may, in the words of him who was nearer the Lord than any other. My hope was therefore great when I saw, in reading the Greek, that the shifting of a period would rid me of the redundancy. And I found the change did unfold such a truth as showed the rhetoric itself in accordance with the highest thought of the apostle. Let us then look at the passage as I think it ought to be translated, and then seek the meaning for the sake of which it was written. It is a meaning indeed by no means dependent on this passage, belonging as it does to the very truth as it is in Jesus; but it is therein magnificently expressed by the apostle, and differently from anywhere else:

“All things were made through him, and without him was made not one thing. That which was made in him was life, and the life was the light of men.”

Note the antithesis of the through and the in. In this grand assertion seems to me to lie, more than shadowed, the germ of creation and redemption—of all the divine in its relation to all the human.