Scotch Songs and Ballads: Gaein' and Comin'

Scotch Songs and Ballads: Gaein' and Comin'

Below David Jack's recitation of George MacDonald's Gaein' and Comin' you'll find the original poem, in Scots, followed by David's English translation. You can find this and many other poems in both Scots and English in the Sunrise edition of The Disciple and Other Poems, available from Wise Path Books. It is based on the original 1867 publication; but we note that the Johannesen edition, which is based on an 1893 publication, has some interesting variants near the poem's end. To avoid any spoilers, see below for details. 

From the Falconer Project: The Flooers o' the Forest

From the Falconer Project: The Flooers o' the Forest

'That's no that ill,' (“That's not that bad,”) remarked the farmer. 'But eh! man, ye suld hae heard yer gran'father han'le the bow. That was something to hear—ance in a body's life. Ye wad hae jist thoucht the strings had been drawn frae his ain inside, he kent them sae weel, and han'led them sae fine. He jist fan' them like wi' 's fingers throu' the bow an' the horsehair an' a', an' a' the time he was drawin' the soun' like the sowl frae them, an' they jist did onything 'at he likit. Eh! to hear him play the Flooers o' the Forest wad hae garred ye greit.' (“But eh! man, you should have heard your grandfather handle the bow. That was something to hear-once in your life. You would have just thought the strings had been drawn from his own inside, he knew them so well, and handled them so fine.)